Cindy Noonan Media Kit

Bio that may be used to introduce Cindy.

  1. Cindy Noonan’s new edition of her novel about a slave boy who runs away on the Underground Railroad, Dark Enough to See the Stars, is now available, with a map added of Moses’ journey to freedom.
  2. She has studied about the Underground Railroad, (or transportation in the 1800s, or slavery, or creative writing), and has interesting facts to share.
  3. She has taught full time at a Christian elementary/middle school.
  4. Cindy and her husband, Frank, have been married 48 years. They have raised five children and have nine grandchildren.

Possible discussion topics:

About the Underground Railroad

  1. Was the Underground Railroad a real railroad?
  2. Why was it called an Underground Railroad?
  3. Did someone plan the Underground Railroad?
  4. How did people travel on the Underground Railroad and where did they stay?
  5. Were real railroads ever used on the Underground Railroad?
  6. What were workers on the Underground Railroad called?
  7. What kind of people worked on the Underground Railroad?
  8. Who were some famous people on the Underground Railroad?
  9. Using your imagination: write a letter pretending you are a literate slave, freed slave, worker on the Underground Railroad, etc.

About transportation in the 1800s

  1. What were roads made of in the 1800s?
  2. Were stagecoaches only used in the Wild West?
  3. What was a plank road?
  4. Why and how were canals built?
  5. How did railroads replace canals?

About slavery in America

  1. When did slavery start?
  2. How did slaves get to America?
  3. How were slaves treated?
  4. What laws supported slavery, and what laws helped slavery end?
  5. When did slavery end in the North?
  6. When did slavery end in the South?
  7. What effect did emancipation have on former slaves, their slave owners, and the southern economy?
  8. Using your imagination: write a letter pretending you are a literate slave, freed slave, worker on the Underground Railroad, etc.

About creative writing

  1. Learning to write metaphors and synonyms
  2. Painting word pictures using your five senses
  3. Using your imagination: write a letter pretending you are a literate slave, freed slave, worker on the Underground Railroad, etc.

These are suggestions; however, I would be happy to customize the topic to your specific classroom needs.

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